Tell FIFA: No Political Symbols, No LGBT Rainbow

Sep 2, 2019 by

Petition from CitizenGo:

In international football matches, the United States, the Republic of Ireland, and some professional teams have required players to wear an LGBT rainbow on their jerseys. England required players to wear LGBT rainbow laces on their cleats. Some teams have required captains to wear an LGBT rainbow captain’s armband. Some have placed the LGBT rainbow on corner flags.

The LGBT rainbow is a political symbol. The Laws of the Game from the International Football Association Board (IFAB) state, “Equipment must not have any political, religious or personal slogans, statements or images” (Law 04.5). FIFA’s Equipment Regulations add that this includes a ban on any “political or comparable symbol” (Article 8.3). FIFA needs to enforce its own rules.

Not everyone agrees with the causes represented by the LGBT rainbow. Players who have declined to wear the LGBT rainbow in international and league play have been harassed and now risk being disadvantaged in their careers.

When Jaelene Hinkle, a Christian professional football player, was called up to play on the United States Women’s National Team in June 2017, she found out the U.S. team was going to require players to wear an LGBT rainbow on their uniforms for “LGBTQ Pride month.” She declined to play because she, as a Christian, felt she should not wear the jersey with the LGBT rainbow. This is unfair to her. No player should be subjected to a political test in order to be considered for a team.

FIFA and IFAB have a responsibility to assure players are judged by their soccer skills, not by their political or religious views. No one should be required to wear a political symbol with which they disagree.

Read and sign here

According to the detailed 2019 Let All Play report, linked on our petition page, The Laws of the Game from the International Football Association Board (IFAB) state, “Equipment must not have any political, religious or personal slogans, statements or images” (Law 04.5). FIFA’s Equipment Regulations add that this includes a ban on any “political or comparable symbol” (Article 8.3).

FIFA and IFAB need to enforce their own rules!

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